Essay

The Life Of Dr Johnson

The Life of Dr Johnson By James Boswell Biographical Literature

Biography Of The Life Of Dr Johnson

Related Tags: The Life Of Dr Johnson Summary, The Life Of Dr Johnson Analysis, The Life Of Dr Johnson Biography, The Life Of Dr Johnson Literature, The Life Of Dr Johnson Biographical Literature, The Life Of Dr Johnson Summary & Analysis The Life Of Dr Johnson themes, The Life Of Dr Johnson By James Boswell.

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The American Scholar

The American Scholar By Ralph Waldo Emerson

The American Scholar
The American Scholar
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Feminism In India and West

Feminism In India & Feminism In West

Feminism In India and West
Feminism In India and West

Introduction

  • The Right of an Education.
  • Equal pay in work the workplace.
  • Reproductive Rights.
  • Women’s suffrage.
  • Fighting against gender stereotypes and performative behaviour.
  • Protection against sexual harassment and assault.
  • The rights of own property.
WavesTime PeriodIssues
First19th to 20th CenturyRight of Vote
Second1960s to 1980sDomesticity & Sexuality
Third1990s to 2000sDiversity & Intersectionality
Fourth2000 to presentEmpowerment

Feminism In The Indian Context

Feminism in the Indian Context can be divided into three Phase

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Women Writing In India 600 B.C to Present

“Women Writing in India: 600 B.C. to the Present” by Susie Tharu and K. Lalita

Women Writing In India 600 B.C to Present
Women Writing In India 600 B.C to Present

Introduction

Women Writing in India: 600 B.C. to the Present” is a fascinating book written by Susie Tharu and K. Lalita, that showcases the writings of women in India throughout history. This is Volume 1 of the series, and it presents a diverse collection of literary works spanning a wide range of time periods, languages, and regions in India. It sets the stage for exploring the contributions of women writers and emphasizes the importance of recognizing their voices in the literary landscape. The first volume covers the period from 600 B.C. to the early twentieth century and includes texts from Sanskrit, Tamil, Pali, Prakrit, Persian, Urdu, Bengali, Marathi, and other languages.

The first volume spans from 600 B.C. to the early twentieth century and includes 127 selections from 88 writers. The selections are arranged in nine sections, each covering a different historical period and literary tradition. The sections are:

– The Beginnings: Women’s Writing in India from 600 B.C. to A.D. 600
– The Classical Age: Women’s Writing in India from A.D. 600 to A.D. 1300
– The Medieval Period: Women’s Writing in India from A.D. 1300 to A.D. 1800
– The Early Modern Period: Women’s Writing in India from A.D. 1800 to A.D. 1857
– The Colonial Period: Women’s Writing in India from A.D. 1857 to A.D. 1900

– The Nationalist Movement: Women’s Writing in India from A.D. 1900 to A.D. 1920
– The Gandhian Era: Women’s Writing in India from A.D. 1920 to A.D. 1947
– The Post-Independence Period: Women’s Writing in India from A.D. 1947 to A.D. 1960
– The Contemporary Period: Women’s Writing in India from A.D. 1960 to A.D. 1990

Critical Analysis Of Women Writing in India Essay

The texts in Women Writing in India: 600 B.C. to the Present offer a rich and varied portrait of Indian women’s lives over the centuries. They provide insights into the social, political, and religious forces that have shaped women’s experiences. The texts also reveal the resilience and creativity of Indian women, who have found ways to express themselves and challenge the status quo.

The author shows that emerges from the anthology is the importance of education for women. Many of the writers in the anthology stress the need for women to be educated in order to achieve their full potential. They argue that education will help women to become more independent, to participate more fully in society, and to improve their lives.

The anthology is about the struggle for women’s rights. Many of the writers in the anthology write about the need to end discrimination against women, improve their legal status, and gain access to economic opportunities. They argue that women’s rights are human rights and that all women deserve to be treated with dignity and respect.

The texts in Women Writing in India: 600 B.C. to the Present are a powerful testament to the strength and resilience of Indian women. They offer a glimpse into the lives of women who have faced many challenges, but who have never given up hope. The texts are a valuable resource for anyone interested in understanding the history of women in India, and the challenges and opportunities that they face today.

Summary Of Women Writing in India

The anthology is divided into four sections: “Early Writings,” “The Nineteenth Century,” “The Early Twentieth Century,” and “The Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries.”

The first section includes works from the Sanskrit and Prakrit traditions, as well as from the Tamil and Telugu languages. The second section focuses on the nineteenth century, a time of great social and political change in India. The third section covers the early twentieth century, a period of increasing nationalism and women’s activism. The fourth section brings together works from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a time of great literary and cultural ferment.

The anthology includes a wide range of writing, from the religious and philosophical to the erotic and the political. The works are diverse in terms of their subject matter, style, and tone. Some of the works are lyrical and evocative, while others are more didactic or polemical. Some of the works are humorous, while others are deeply serious.

Women Writing in India” Anthology provides a valuable overview of the history of women’s writing in India. It also offers a glimpse into the lives and experiences of Indian women over the centuries. The works in the anthology speak to the diversity of Indian culture and the resilience of Indian women.

The following are some of the key themes that emerge from the anthology:

The struggle for women’s rights: Many of the works in the anthology deal with the struggle for women’s rights. These works address issues such as the right to education, the right to work, and the right to equality.

The importance of education for women: Many of the works in the anthology highlight the importance of education for women. These works argue that education is essential for women’s empowerment and for their ability to contribute to society.

The need for social reform: Many of the works in the anthology call for social reform. These works address issues such as child marriage, dowry, and Sati.

The power of the written word: Many of the works in the anthology celebrate the power of the written word. These works argue that writing can be used to challenge injustice, raise awareness, and create change.

The importance of family and community: Many of the works in the anthology emphasize the importance of family and community. These works show how family and community can provide support and strength in times of difficulty.

The beauty of nature: Many of the works in the anthology celebrate the beauty of nature. These works show how nature can provide solace, inspiration, and hope.

The strength of the human spirit: Many of the works in the anthology affirm the strength of the human spirit. These works show how people can overcome adversity and find hope in the face of despair.

Women Writing in India: 600 B.C. to the Present is an important anthology that provides a valuable overview of the history of women’s writing in India. The works in the anthology offer a glimpse into the lives and experiences of Indian women over the centuries. They also speak to the diversity of Indian culture and the resilience of Indian women. The anthology is a valuable resource for anyone interested in Indian literature, history, or women’s studies.

The book is divided into four volumes, each covering a different historical period and theme. The first volume, titled “The Beginnings”, covers the period from 600 B.C. to 1200 A.D., and features writings from ancient and medieval India. The second volume, titled “The Twentieth Century”, covers the period from 1900 to 1980, and features writings from the colonial and postcolonial eras. The third volume, titled “Feminisms”, covers the period from 1980 to 1995, and features writings from the contemporary feminist movement. The fourth volume, titled “In Other Words”, covers the period from 1995 to 2000, and features writings from marginalized and subaltern groups.

The book is a valuable resource for anyone interested in Indian literature, culture, history, and gender studies. It offers a rich and diverse selection of texts that showcase the creativity and agency of Indian women writers. It also offers a critical analysis of the literary traditions and practices of Indian women, as well as their social and political struggles and achievements. The book is a testament to the power and beauty of women’s voices in IndiaThe anthology includes a wide variety of genres, including poetry, fiction, drama, autobiography, and essays. The writers represented in the anthology come from all over India and write in a variety of languages.

The anthology provides a valuable overview of the history of women’s writing in India. It also offers insights into the lives and experiences of Indian women over the centuries.

Themes Of The Women Writing In India

The Struggle for Women’s Rights

Many of the works in the anthology deal with the struggle for women’s rights. These works address issues such as the right to education, the right to work, and the right to equality.

The importance of education for women

Many of the works in the anthology highlight the importance of education for women. These works argue that education is essential for women’s empowerment and for their ability to contribute to society.

The Need for social reform

Many of the works in the anthology call for social reform. These works address issues such as child marriage, dowry, and Sati.

The power of the written word

Many of the works in the anthology celebrate the power of the written word. These works argue that writing can be used to challenge injustice, raise awareness, and create change.

The importance of family and community

Many of the works in the anthology emphasize the importance of family and community. These works show how family and community can provide support and strength in times of difficulty.

The Beauty Of Nature

Many of the works in the anthology celebrate the beauty of nature. These works show how nature can provide solace, inspiration, and hope.

The strength of the human spirit

Many of the works in the anthology affirm the strength of the human spirit. These works show how people can overcome adversity and find hope in the face of despair.

Conclusion

Women Writing in India: 600 B.C. to the Present is a groundbreaking and comprehensive anthology that celebrates and explores the rich and diverse tradition of women’s writing in India. It is an essential resource for anyone interested in Indian literature, history, culture, feminism, or postcolonial studies.

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Beau Tibbs By Oliver Goldsmith

Beau Tibbs By Oliver Goldsmith

Beau Tibbs By Oliver Goldsmith
Beau Tibbs By Oliver Goldsmith

Introduction

         The essay “Beau Tibbs” is the most significant collection of essays by Oliver Goldsmith. It is a collection of essays that deal with the character of peculiar persons. It teaches us, peculiar people. It teaches us so many practical lessons for a graceful life.

Goldsmith wants to stress the teaching,

 “The company of fools may,
  at first, make us smile
  but at last, never fails
  of rendering us melancholy.”

          He also throws light the contemporary English Society. Beau Tibs represents the contemporary English Middle class. The meaning of Beau Tibbs is a showy man.

About Oliver Goldsmith

         Oliver Goldsmith was an essayist of The Age of Transition. He wrote both poetry and essays. He contributed to the periodical essays. His essays have extraordinary power, boldness, originality of thoughts, humour, and tenderness. His style is clear and delicate which made him a great essayist. He was one of the most important writers of the Augustan age, otherwise known as the neoclassical age or the age of Reason.

He is noted for his novel, “The Vicar of Wakefield”, his pastoral poem “The Desert Village and his Plays”, “The Good-Natured Man” and “She Stoops to Conquer”, his classic Children’s tale “The History of Little Goody Two Shoes.”

Analysis of The Essay Beau Tibbs

            The essay “Beau Tibbs” has portrayed the character of Mr. Tibbs. The essayist calls him a Beau. This word indicates the inherent character of Mr. Tibbs that he was an elderly man who always remained particular to his dress and also pays unnecessary attention to women. So the word Beau has been used sarcastically to show the levity of his character.

            Mr. Tibbs was a very poor man but he always tried to conceal it from others, though unsuccessfully. This habit of Mr. Tibbs had made him an eccentric and he had developed a very ridiculous nature. Whenever he meets someone, he boasts of his high Contacts. He was equally peculiar in his dress. When the essayist met him, he noticed that

“His looks were pale, thin, and sharp;
 Round his neck, he wore a broad black ribbon
 and in his bosom a buckle studded with glass….
 and his stockings of silk, through newly washed,
 were grown yellow by long service.”

            He was habitual of dressing himself peculiarly and variously, sometimes in torn and at other times in beautiful dress.

            Mr. Tibbs invites the narrator to his house. Tibbs wants to introduce his wife and daughter to the narrator. He informs that his daughter knows the famous country dance and can play the guitar well. He says that he is designing her for his friend’s son. Mr. Tibbs also informs him about his wife. During his talk, he repeatedly asks the narrator to keep all this information secret. He takes the narrator to his house, not through a straight road, but through many dark and winding ways.

            His boastful nature was the greatest weakness of his character. He always tries to impress others that he had very close contacts and familiarity with the Lords and Ladies of high status and often dined with them in the cities and towns privately. He was too proud to admit his poverty and boasted of being on close terms with the aristocracy. He foolishly thought that the people believed whatever he told them about him.

Goldsmith has revealed his character in an extremely humorous but sarcastic manner. When he started talking with Charles, Tibbs told the Lord had granted him the favor of offering five hundred a year and ‘His lordship took me down in his own Chariot yesterday and we had a tete-a tete dinner in the country where we talked of nothing else.

            Then at once, as if suddenly reminded, he tells that he had actually dined in town. He was among the select party to dine at Lady Grograms. But after talking so long about his foolish stories, he suddenly comes to his real self. He asked Charles to give him Half-a-Crown(two shillings). Tibbs does this with everybody he meets and thus earns his acquaintances, he tells. He never repaid the borrowed from his friend and they knew the fact very well.

            Though this character of Goldsmith has imparted a piece of very useful advice to the young people who depended on the mercy of others but always thought themselves very clever, he advised that such hypocrisy is always damaging and we should save ourselves from such evil.

Conclusion

            Thus, Oliver Goldsmith can be said the representative writer of his age. His writings carry almost all the characteristics of the period he belonged to. The essay Beau Tibbs shows the vanity of the middle class of that age through the characters, Beau Tibbs.

Now we can say that through the essay “Beau Tibbs” Oliver Goldsmith satirized the English society.

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